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{"id":390413139,"title":"Thyme - (Thymus Vulgaris) - 50 grams","handle":"thyme","description":"\u003cb\u003eTHYME\u003c\/b\u003e \u003cb\u003e - \u003c\/b\u003e\u003cb\u003eThymus vulgaris - Mint Family\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003eCommon names: Common thyme, garden thyme, tomillo \u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003eHISTORY OF USE\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eThyme is an ancient Mediterranean herb with a long history of use as both medicine and food. The Egyptians used thyme’s powerful antiseptic and preservative qualities by including it in their embalming mixture. The Greek word thymus means “courage” and the Greeks denoted thyme as elegance. The Romans used Thyme medicinally as a cough remedy, digestive aid, and treatment for intestinal worms. During the Middle Ages, thyme became linked to courage. It was fashionable for noble women to embroider sprigs of thyme on scarves and give them to favorite knights departing for the Crusades. As the centuries passed, thyme was used as an antiseptic during plagues. Those troubled by “melancholia” (depression) were advised to sleep on thyme-stuffed pillows. By the late 17th century, apothecary shops were selling thyme oil as a topical antiseptic under the name “oil of origanum.” In 1853, French chemist M. Lallemand named it thymol. From the mid-19th century through World War I, thymol enjoyed great popularity as an antiseptic. In the late 19th century, thyme was used in hospitals as a disinfectant and to speed patients’ recovery. Although thymol has since been replaced by more potent germ fighters, it remains an ingredient in several antiseptic mouthwashes. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003eCULINARY USE\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eThyme is a favored herb in Greek, Italian, and French cuisines. Thyme pairs well with lamb, poultry, tomato, lemons, and flavors sauces, soups, stocks.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cb\u003eMEDICINAL USE\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eThyme increases vitality. The thymol volatile oil has been used in herbal cough drops and in commercial antiseptics. Its antimicrobial and antispasmodic actions lend itself well to promote health in a variety of situations.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eNervous system: \u003c\/b\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eThyme helps with occasional mild anxiety, helps with occasional sleeplessness.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eRespiratory system: \u003c\/b\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eConstant clearing of the throat with mucus secretions is alleviated with the use of thyme. It has been used in European tradition for whooping cough. It can be helpful with any feverish condition to open pores, warm the system, and thin and move mucus. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eImmune system:\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e In laboratory studies, thyme fights several disease-causing bacteria and fungi, supporting the herb’s traditional role as an antiseptic.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eDigestive system:\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e Thymol relaxes the smooth muscle tissue of the gastrointestinal tract, making thyme an antispasmodic. The action of these chemical constituents lends support to its traditional role as a digestive aid.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eReproductive system:\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e Antispasmodics relax not only the digestive tract but also other smooth muscles, such as the uterus. Tincture of thyme may help relieve menstrual cramps, lending credence to the Eclectic physicians’ use of this herb. In large amounts, thyme oil and thymol are considered uterine stimulants.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003eHERBAL ACTIONS\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eantiseptic, astringent, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antibiotic, diuretic, expectorant, antitussive, antispasmodic, antioxidant, anthelmintic\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003eFLAVOR \u0026amp; ENERGETICS\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003ePungent, hot, dry, stimulating\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003eCONSTITUENTS\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eVolatile oils, including thymol; bitter principle; tannin; flavonoids; triterpenoids.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003eCAUTIONS\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003eDo not use thyme medicinally during pregnancy. Suggested culinary spice amounts are okay, however. Thyme oil can irritate mucous membranes so ensure it is well diluted.\u003cb\u003e \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eTEA BLENDS\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eFor sore throats, it combines well with sage. To boost the immune system, mix with echinacea.\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eDISCLAIMER\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eThis information is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, heal, mitigate, or remedy disease. It is for educational purposes only and should not be implemented without the express consent of your healthcare practitioner.\u003c\/span\u003e","published_at":"2014-10-21T18:58:00-04:00","created_at":"2014-10-21T18:58:14-04:00","vendor":"Stamatopoulos \u0026 Sons","type":"Herbs, Teas, \u0026 Spices","tags":["Herbs \u0026 Spices \u0026 Teas"],"price":99,"price_min":99,"price_max":700,"available":true,"price_varies":true,"compare_at_price":null,"compare_at_price_min":0,"compare_at_price_max":0,"compare_at_price_varies":false,"variants":[{"id":914794555,"title":"50g","option1":"50g","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"728943764031","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":false,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Thyme - (Thymus Vulgaris) - 50 grams - 50g","public_title":"50g","options":["50g"],"price":700,"weight":50,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":113,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":"728943764031"},{"id":37442915724,"title":"1oz","option1":"1oz","option2":null,"option3":null,"sku":"728943764032b","requires_shipping":true,"taxable":false,"featured_image":null,"available":true,"name":"Thyme - (Thymus Vulgaris) - 50 grams - 1oz","public_title":"1oz","options":["1oz"],"price":99,"weight":50,"compare_at_price":null,"inventory_quantity":22,"inventory_management":"shopify","inventory_policy":"deny","barcode":"728943764031"}],"images":["\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0677\/1065\/products\/600_x_600_Thyme1.jpg?v=1487877070","\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0677\/1065\/products\/600_x_600_Thyme.jpg?v=1487877070"],"featured_image":"\/\/cdn.shopify.com\/s\/files\/1\/0677\/1065\/products\/600_x_600_Thyme1.jpg?v=1487877070","options":["Size"],"content":"\u003cb\u003eTHYME\u003c\/b\u003e \u003cb\u003e - \u003c\/b\u003e\u003cb\u003eThymus vulgaris - Mint Family\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003eCommon names: Common thyme, garden thyme, tomillo \u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003eHISTORY OF USE\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eThyme is an ancient Mediterranean herb with a long history of use as both medicine and food. The Egyptians used thyme’s powerful antiseptic and preservative qualities by including it in their embalming mixture. The Greek word thymus means “courage” and the Greeks denoted thyme as elegance. The Romans used Thyme medicinally as a cough remedy, digestive aid, and treatment for intestinal worms. During the Middle Ages, thyme became linked to courage. It was fashionable for noble women to embroider sprigs of thyme on scarves and give them to favorite knights departing for the Crusades. As the centuries passed, thyme was used as an antiseptic during plagues. Those troubled by “melancholia” (depression) were advised to sleep on thyme-stuffed pillows. By the late 17th century, apothecary shops were selling thyme oil as a topical antiseptic under the name “oil of origanum.” In 1853, French chemist M. Lallemand named it thymol. From the mid-19th century through World War I, thymol enjoyed great popularity as an antiseptic. In the late 19th century, thyme was used in hospitals as a disinfectant and to speed patients’ recovery. Although thymol has since been replaced by more potent germ fighters, it remains an ingredient in several antiseptic mouthwashes. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003eCULINARY USE\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eThyme is a favored herb in Greek, Italian, and French cuisines. Thyme pairs well with lamb, poultry, tomato, lemons, and flavors sauces, soups, stocks.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cb\u003eMEDICINAL USE\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eThyme increases vitality. The thymol volatile oil has been used in herbal cough drops and in commercial antiseptics. Its antimicrobial and antispasmodic actions lend itself well to promote health in a variety of situations.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eNervous system: \u003c\/b\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eThyme helps with occasional mild anxiety, helps with occasional sleeplessness.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eRespiratory system: \u003c\/b\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eConstant clearing of the throat with mucus secretions is alleviated with the use of thyme. It has been used in European tradition for whooping cough. It can be helpful with any feverish condition to open pores, warm the system, and thin and move mucus. \u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eImmune system:\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e In laboratory studies, thyme fights several disease-causing bacteria and fungi, supporting the herb’s traditional role as an antiseptic.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eDigestive system:\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e Thymol relaxes the smooth muscle tissue of the gastrointestinal tract, making thyme an antispasmodic. The action of these chemical constituents lends support to its traditional role as a digestive aid.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eReproductive system:\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e Antispasmodics relax not only the digestive tract but also other smooth muscles, such as the uterus. Tincture of thyme may help relieve menstrual cramps, lending credence to the Eclectic physicians’ use of this herb. In large amounts, thyme oil and thymol are considered uterine stimulants.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003eHERBAL ACTIONS\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eantiseptic, astringent, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antibiotic, diuretic, expectorant, antitussive, antispasmodic, antioxidant, anthelmintic\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003eFLAVOR \u0026amp; ENERGETICS\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003ePungent, hot, dry, stimulating\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003eCONSTITUENTS\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eVolatile oils, including thymol; bitter principle; tannin; flavonoids; triterpenoids.\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003e\u003cbr\u003eCAUTIONS\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003eDo not use thyme medicinally during pregnancy. Suggested culinary spice amounts are okay, however. Thyme oil can irritate mucous membranes so ensure it is well diluted.\u003cb\u003e \u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eTEA BLENDS\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eFor sore throats, it combines well with sage. To boost the immune system, mix with echinacea.\u003cbr\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cb\u003eDISCLAIMER\u003c\/b\u003e\u003cbr\u003e\u003cspan style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003eThis information is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, heal, mitigate, or remedy disease. It is for educational purposes only and should not be implemented without the express consent of your healthcare practitioner.\u003c\/span\u003e"}

Thyme - (Thymus Vulgaris) - 50 grams

Product Description
THYME - Thymus vulgaris - Mint Family
Common names: Common thyme, garden thyme, tomillo

HISTORY OF USE

Thyme is an ancient Mediterranean herb with a long history of use as both medicine and food. The Egyptians used thyme’s powerful antiseptic and preservative qualities by including it in their embalming mixture. The Greek word thymus means “courage” and the Greeks denoted thyme as elegance. The Romans used Thyme medicinally as a cough remedy, digestive aid, and treatment for intestinal worms. During the Middle Ages, thyme became linked to courage. It was fashionable for noble women to embroider sprigs of thyme on scarves and give them to favorite knights departing for the Crusades. As the centuries passed, thyme was used as an antiseptic during plagues. Those troubled by “melancholia” (depression) were advised to sleep on thyme-stuffed pillows. By the late 17th century, apothecary shops were selling thyme oil as a topical antiseptic under the name “oil of origanum.” In 1853, French chemist M. Lallemand named it thymol. From the mid-19th century through World War I, thymol enjoyed great popularity as an antiseptic. In the late 19th century, thyme was used in hospitals as a disinfectant and to speed patients’ recovery. Although thymol has since been replaced by more potent germ fighters, it remains an ingredient in several antiseptic mouthwashes.

CULINARY USE

Thyme is a favored herb in Greek, Italian, and French cuisines. Thyme pairs well with lamb, poultry, tomato, lemons, and flavors sauces, soups, stocks.

MEDICINAL USE
Thyme increases vitality. The thymol volatile oil has been used in herbal cough drops and in commercial antiseptics. Its antimicrobial and antispasmodic actions lend itself well to promote health in a variety of situations.
Nervous system: Thyme helps with occasional mild anxiety, helps with occasional sleeplessness.
Respiratory system: Constant clearing of the throat with mucus secretions is alleviated with the use of thyme. It has been used in European tradition for whooping cough. It can be helpful with any feverish condition to open pores, warm the system, and thin and move mucus.
Immune system: In laboratory studies, thyme fights several disease-causing bacteria and fungi, supporting the herb’s traditional role as an antiseptic.
Digestive system: Thymol relaxes the smooth muscle tissue of the gastrointestinal tract, making thyme an antispasmodic. The action of these chemical constituents lends support to its traditional role as a digestive aid.
Reproductive system: Antispasmodics relax not only the digestive tract but also other smooth muscles, such as the uterus. Tincture of thyme may help relieve menstrual cramps, lending credence to the Eclectic physicians’ use of this herb. In large amounts, thyme oil and thymol are considered uterine stimulants.

HERBAL ACTIONS

antiseptic, astringent, antimicrobial, antiparasitic, antibiotic, diuretic, expectorant, antitussive, antispasmodic, antioxidant, anthelmintic

FLAVOR & ENERGETICS

Pungent, hot, dry, stimulating

CONSTITUENTS

Volatile oils, including thymol; bitter principle; tannin; flavonoids; triterpenoids.

CAUTIONS

Do not use thyme medicinally during pregnancy. Suggested culinary spice amounts are okay, however. Thyme oil can irritate mucous membranes so ensure it is well diluted.

TEA BLENDS
For sore throats, it combines well with sage. To boost the immune system, mix with echinacea.

DISCLAIMER
This information is not intended to treat, diagnose, cure, heal, mitigate, or remedy disease. It is for educational purposes only and should not be implemented without the express consent of your healthcare practitioner.
$ 7.00
Maximum quantity available reached.